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Physiological & Psychological Impact of Racism and Discrimination for African-Americans

On Feb. 1, 1960, four stools at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C., sparked national media attention and lead to hundreds of subsequent sit-ins across the country. The immediate and impactful influence that these four African-American students had on the non-violence movement during the civil rights era is frequently praised, particularly during Black History Month. However, the enormous personal stress that they likely experienced as they occupied those stools is less often considered. In honor of the four African-American students and African-Americans across the diaspora, the Ethnicity and Health in America Series is raising awareness about the physiological and psychological impact of racism and discrimination as it relates to stress. The chronic condition of stress was selected because of its prevalence and impact on health within health disparity population groups (e.g., people of color), and their high association with many other chronic diseases

 

Physiological & Psychological Impact of Racism and Discrimination for African-Americans

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