Violence & Trauma

Developmental Growth Trajectories of Self-Esteem in Adolescence: Associations with Child Neglect and Drug Use and Abuse in Young Adulthood

Neglectful rearing is linked with young adults’ substance use and abuse, though the developmental mechanisms that underlie this association are unclear. The present study examines links between self-esteem growth during adolescence, childhood supervisory versus physical neglect severity, and substance use and abuse in young adulthood. A sample of youth was obtained from the Add Health study (N = 8738; 55.4 %-Female; 20 %-African American, 14.7 %-Hispanic). Growth mixture modeling analyses supported declining, ascending, and stable high self-esteem trajectories. The declining ...

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Suicide, psychiatric illness, and social maladjustment in intercountry adoptees in Sweden: a cohort study.

BACKGROUND:

Many intercountry adoptees are reaching adolescence in western Europe and the USA, and the mental health and social adjustment of these individuals as adolescents and young adults has now become an important issue. We aimed to assess mental health disorders and social maladjustment in adolescence and young adulthood in intercountry adoptees in Sweden.

METHOD:

Our data was obtained from the Swedish national registers for the cohort born in 1970-79. We used multivariate Cox’s regression models of person-years to compare indicators of suicide ...

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The Racial Generation Gap and the Future for Our Children

Children are not faring well in America. Over the course of the two-year presidential campaign cycle that is well underway, eight million children will be born in this country. If our nation’s elected leaders do nothing, more than 75,000 of those children born in this country below the age of 2 will be abused or neglected, over 500,000 will be uninsured, and nearly two million will live in poverty — a disadvantage that research has shown to have lifelong negative ...

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VCU Study: Bad environment Augments Genetic Risk for Drug Abuse

The risk of abusing drugs is greater – even for adopted children – if the family environment in which they are raised is dysfunctional, according to a new study conducted by a collaborative team from Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden.

Previous research suggests that drug abuse is strongly influenced by a mix of genetic factors and the environment, including influences of family and peers. That research is primarily based on twin studies and typically involves families that are ...

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Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international adoptees: a meta-analysis.

International adoption involves more than 40,000 children a year moving among more than 100 countries. Before adoption, internationaladoptees often experience insufficient medical care, malnutrition, maternal separation, and neglect and abuse in orphanages. Most international adoptees are well-adjusted although they are referred to mental health services more often than nonadopted controls. However, international adoptees present fewer behavior problems and are less often referred to mental health services than domesticadoptees.

 

Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international ...

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Report: The Mentoring Effect

Based off a survey regarding young persons and mentoring, there is not only a mentoring gap in America but also a mentoring need. It is estimated that more than one in three youths, which is roughly 16 million, have never had an adult mentor. This estimate includes roughly nine million at-risk youths, who are therefore less likely to graduate high school, go to college, and lead healthy and productive lives. Those that have been found to have a mentor provides ...

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The Teen Brain

NPR writer Richard Knox published an article on the teenage brain to help answer the question many parents ask their teenagers, “What were you thinking?” Pediatric Neurologist Frances Jensen learned that the question is not what teens think but rather how. The teenage brain itself is not fully developed yet, and a crucial part of the brain, the frontal lobes, are not fully connected. Jensen says, “It’s the part of the brain that says: ‘Is this a good idea? What is ...

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Bullying of Disabled and Non-Disabled High School Students

Students with disabilities are considered to be at greater risk for bullying than students without disabilities. The WestEd Justice & Prevention Research Center collaborated with staff across WestEd to analyze data from Maine’s statewide Integrated Youth Survey to examine risk rates for these student populations.

As expected, students with disabilities had substantially higher rates of bullying victimization compared to students without disabilities. WestEd researchers Sarah Guckenburg, Susan Hayes, Anthony Petrosino, and Thomas Hanson, and consultant Alexis Stern ...

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Two Strikes Race and the Disciplining of Young Students

There are large racial disparities in school discipline in the United States, which, for Black students, not only contribute to school failure but also can lay a path toward incarceration. Although the disparities have been well documented, the psychological mechanisms underlying them are unclear. In two experiments, we tested the hypothesis that such disparities are, in part, driven by racial stereotypes that can lead teachers to escalate their negative responses to Black students over the course of multiple interpersonal (e.g., ...

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UNDERSTANDING WHY ADOPTEES ARE AT HIGHER RISK FOR SUICIDE

Most people view adoption as a happy, even blessed, event. A child finds a new family: nothing but joy, right? Adoption can be happy, a blessing, joyful. For some adoptees, though, adoption is complex, and can be filled with as much loss as love.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, adoptees are four times more likely to attempt suicide than non-adoptees. It’shere in Pediatrics. Even more startling is that the mean age of the 1000 participants was about 14. ...

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Some Stats for Your Back-to-School

U.S. News reports some different statistics, along with charts and graphs, of issues concerning youth in America.

 

Some Stats for Your Back-to-School

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2015′s Best and Worst States for Underprivileged Children

In an ideal world, children live carefree and have access to their basic needs: nutritious food, a good education, quality health care, adequate safety as well as the love and support of caring adults. When all of these needs are met, children have a strong chance of growing up to become productive members of society. But such fundamental rights are privileges for many children in the U.S. Despite its position as one of the world’s most powerful and prosperous countries, ...

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