Race

Stanford study finds blacks and Hispanics typically need higher incomes than whites to live in affluent neighborhoods

New research from Stanford Graduate School of Education shows that middle-class black and Hispanic households live in poorer neighborhoods than white and Asian families with comparable incomes. The findings underscore how specific groups face steeper hurdles to upward mobility.

 

Stanford study finds blacks and Hispanics typically need higher incomes than whites to live in affluent neighborhoods

Continue Reading →
0

Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schools

Inadequate college preparation in elementary and secondary school creates a significant barrier to postsecondary education among students living in poverty, a report from CLASP finds. Based on an analysis of the  hundred largest school districts in the United States, the report, Course, Counselor, and Teacher Gaps: Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schools (17 pages, PDF), highlights the stark differences in the quality of preparation students receive in high-poverty schools compared with students in ...

Continue Reading →
0

Black child poverty rate holds steady, even as other groups see declines

The share of American children living in poverty has declined slightly since 2010 as the nation’s economy has improved. But the poverty rate has changed little for black children, the group most likely to be living in poverty, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data.

Overall, 20% of children in the U.S., or 14.7 million, lived in poverty in 2013 – down from 22%, or 16.3 million, in 2010. (Poverty in 2013 was defined ...

Continue Reading →
0

Multiracial in America

Multiracial Americans are at the cutting edge of social and demographic change in the U.S.—young, proud, tolerant and growing at a rate three times as fast as the population as a whole.

As America becomes more racially diverse and social taboos against interracial marriage fade, a new Pew Research Center survey finds that majorities of multiracial adults are proud of their mixed-race background (60%) and feel their racial heritage has made them more ...

Continue Reading →
0

Physiological & Psychological Impact of Racism and Discrimination for African-Americans

On Feb. 1, 1960, four stools at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C., sparked national media attention and lead to hundreds of subsequent sit-ins across the country. The immediate and impactful influence that these four African-American students had on the non-violence movement during the civil rights era is frequently praised, particularly during Black History Month. However, the enormous personal stress that they likely experienced as they occupied those stools is less often considered. In honor of the four African-American students ...

Continue Reading →
0

Boosting Educational Attainment and Adult Earnings

Per-pupil spending can vary drastically between school districts, with affluent suburban districts often outspending their neighbors by significant margins. Such disparate school spending is frequently identified as a primary culprit in our nation’s wide achievement gaps between students of different socioeconomic and racial backgrounds. The argument makes intrinsic sense to many: if one school district spends significantly more educating its students, then of course those students will perform better academically. Existing research on the topic, however, paints a muddier picture.

 

Continue Reading →

0

Sexual Health of Adolescents and Young Adults in the United States

In recent years, there has been a reduction in rates of teen pregnancy, births, and abortions.  Similarly there has been a drop off in the share of adolescents engaging in sexual activity. Despite this shift, recent data indicate that the rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among teens and young adults remain higher in the U.S. than in other developed nations and are considerably higher among certain racial and ethnic minorities and in different geographic regions in ...

Continue Reading →
0

Children’s Books by and about People of Color Published in the United States

In 1985 the Cooperative Children’s Book Center began to document the numbers of books published in the United States for children each year which were written and/or illustrated by African Americans. When then-CCBC Director Ginny Moore Kruse served as a member of the Coretta Scott King Award Committee that year, we were appalled to learn that, of the approximately 2,500 trade books that were published that year for children and teens, only 18 were created by African Americans, and ...

Continue Reading →
0

Communities In Schools Makes an Impact

Communities In Schools (CIS) has released its 2015 National Impact Report demonstrating its effectiveness in helping nearly 1.5 million students in almost 2,400 schools break the cycle of poverty and reduce their risk of dropping out.

According to Communities In Schools President Dan Cardinali the need for CIS to intervene in the lives of students is growing because… “the headwinds of poverty are blowing stronger than ever, holding more and more young people back from achieving in school and ...

Continue Reading →
0

D.C. high school graduation rates: how does your school compare?

Last Friday the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) announced the 2014 graduation rates for the District’s public schools. Among OSSE’s findings were that DCPS’s graduation rate increased two percentage points from last year while charter schools’ rate dropped by almost 7 percentage points.

To get a clearer picture of how graduation rates vary by school, we made two interactive graphs for you. The first, below, compares schools’ 2014 graduation rates for all students and subgroups of students, like those ...

Continue Reading →
0
Page 4 of 4 1234