Race

The Racial Generation Gap and the Future for Our Children

Children are not faring well in America. Over the course of the two-year presidential campaign cycle that is well underway, eight million children will be born in this country. If our nation’s elected leaders do nothing, more than 75,000 of those children born in this country below the age of 2 will be abused or neglected, over 500,000 will be uninsured, and nearly two million will live in poverty — a disadvantage that research has shown to have lifelong negative ...

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Building a STEM Pathway: Xavier University of Louisiana’s Summer Science Academy

In Louisia, Xavier University provides a STEM summer Academy as a bridge program for persons of color between middle and high school. Underrepresented groups, such as Hispanics and Blacks, earn less than 15% of STEM bachelor’s degree, despite a large interest in these programs and degrees. The discrepancies in income levels may constitute this difference, causing an achievement gap. This program, as well as this report, offer state suggestions to narrow this gap.

 

 

Building a STEM Pathway: Xavier University of Louisiana’s ...

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Study: How students of different backgrounds use strategies to strengthen college applications

Years of research show that students from families of higher socioeconomic status are more likely to attend college—particularly more selective institutions—thanks to a variety of factors, including academic preparation, attendance at higher performing schools, and other social, cultural, and financial resources available to families with more means.

In addition to their traditional coursework, students often try to make their college applications more competitive through what the researchers call “college enhancement strategies,” including Advanced Placement (AP) exams, SAT preparation courses or materials, ...

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Study: Changing Trends in Asthma Prevalence Among Children

Based off of a study in the American Academy of Pediatrics conducted by Akinbami, Simon, and Rossen (2016), asthma prevalence among children has seen changing trends in recent years. Previously, childhood asthma prevalence doubled from 1980 to 1995 and then increased more slowly from 2001 to 2010. By analyzing survey data for children ages 0-17 years, the researchers discovered demographic subgroup differences in regards to asthma prevalence. Currently, asthma prevalence ceased to increase among children in recent years and the ...

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Bullying of Disabled and Non-Disabled High School Students

Students with disabilities are considered to be at greater risk for bullying than students without disabilities. The WestEd Justice & Prevention Research Center collaborated with staff across WestEd to analyze data from Maine’s statewide Integrated Youth Survey to examine risk rates for these student populations.

As expected, students with disabilities had substantially higher rates of bullying victimization compared to students without disabilities. WestEd researchers Sarah Guckenburg, Susan Hayes, Anthony Petrosino, and Thomas Hanson, and consultant Alexis Stern ...

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Two Strikes Race and the Disciplining of Young Students

There are large racial disparities in school discipline in the United States, which, for Black students, not only contribute to school failure but also can lay a path toward incarceration. Although the disparities have been well documented, the psychological mechanisms underlying them are unclear. In two experiments, we tested the hypothesis that such disparities are, in part, driven by racial stereotypes that can lead teachers to escalate their negative responses to Black students over the course of multiple interpersonal (e.g., ...

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Some Stats for Your Back-to-School

U.S. News reports some different statistics, along with charts and graphs, of issues concerning youth in America.

 

Some Stats for Your Back-to-School

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Four in Ten American Children Live in Low-Income Families, NCCP Researchers Report

Four out of every ten American children live in low-income families, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. This finding from the 2015 edition of the center’s Basic Facts about Low-Income Children fact sheet series underscores the magnitude of the problem of family economic insecurity and child poverty in the United States. Analyzing the latest available U.S. Census data, NCCP researchers find that 44 percent ...

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The Essence of Innocence: Consequences of Dehumanizing Black Children

Black boys as young as 10 may not be viewed in the same light of childhood innocence as their white peers, but are instead more likely to be mistaken as older, be perceived as guilty and face police violence if accused of a crime, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

“Children in most societies are considered to be in a distinct group with characteristics such as innocence and the need for protection. Our research found that black ...

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2015 Building a Grad Nation Report

According to the 2015 Building a Grad Nation report the national high school graduation rate hit a record high of 81.4 percent, and for the third year in a row, the nation remained on pace to meet the goal of 90 percent on-time graduation by 2020.

This sixth annual update on America’s high school dropout challenge shows that these gains have been made possible by raising graduation rates for groups of students that have traditionally struggled to earn a ...

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A Decade of Drug Use by High School Students

Every two years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) asks more than 13,000 high school students across America about the things they do that put them at risk. We’ve mapped the results from 10 of the survey’s questions to discover how the use of drugs and alcohol in high schools changed between 2003 and 2013. Plus, we examine the latest trends from 2014.

 

A Decade of Drug Use by High School Students

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The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story

This report exposes the ways in which the current system criminalizes girls–especially girls of color–who have been sexually and physically abused, and it offers policy recommendations to dismantle the abuse to prison pipeline. It illustrates the pipeline with examples, including the detention of girls who are victims of sex trafficking, girls who run away or become truant because of abuse they experience, and girls who cross into juvenile justice from the child welfare system. By illuminating both the problem and ...

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