Program Quality

Evidence for General and Domain-Specific Elements of Teacher–Child Interactions: Associations With Preschool Children’s Development

This study evaluates a model for considering domain-general and domain-specific associations between teacher–child interactions and children’s development, using a bifactor analytic strategy. Among a sample of 325 early childhood classrooms there was evidence for both general elements of teacher–child interaction (responsive teaching) and domain-specific elements related to positive management and routines and cognitive facilitation. Among a diverse population of 4-year-old children (= 1,407) responsive teaching was modestly associated with development across social and cognitive domains, whereas positive management and routines was ...

Continue Reading →
0

Child-Care Structure → Process → Outcome: Direct and Indirect Effects of Child-Care Quality on Young Children’s Development

With data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care, we used structural equation modeling to test paths from structural indicators of child-care quality, specifically caregiver training and child-staff ratio, through a process indicator to child outcomes. There were three main findings: (a) Quality of maternal caregiving was the strongest predictor of cognitive competence, as well as caregivers’ ratings of social competence; (b) quality of nonmaternal caregiving was associated with cognitive competence and caregivers’ ratings of social competence; and (c) ...

Continue Reading →
0

Snapshot: Civil Citations

When youth get in trouble with the law, it’s important to take a level-headed approach that helps them become contributing members of society while ensuring community safety. Unfortunately, our current juvenile justice system is like an exceptionally difficult maze, with too many paths in and too few ways out. But just entering the maze can have devastating consequences for society at large and for the young people themselves. As stated in a report by the National Institute of Justice and ...

Continue Reading →
0

Home-Based Early Intervention and the Influence of Family Resources on Cognitive Development

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether early developmental intervention (EDI) can positively affect the trajectories of cognitive development among children from low-resource families.

METHODS: Longitudinal analyses were conducted of data from 293 children in the Brain Research to Ameliorate Impaired Neurodevelopment Home-based Intervention Trial, a randomized controlled trial of a home-based EDI program, to examine trajectories of Bayley Scales of Infant Development—Second Edition Mental Development Index (MDI) scores from 12 to 36 months of age among young children from high- and low-resource families ...

Continue Reading →
0

Children’s Gender-Typed Activity Choices Across Preschool Social Contexts

Variability in children’s gender-typed activity preferences was examined across several preschool social contexts–solitary play, interactions with female peers, male peers, and both, and interactions with teachers. Participants were preschool children (N = 264; 49 % girls, M age = 52 months, range 37–60) attending Head Start classes in the Southwest United States. Seventy-three percent were Mexican/Mexican-American, and 82 % of families earned less than $30,000 per year. Children’s preferences for gender-typed activities varied as a function of their own gender and the identity ...

Continue Reading →
0

A case study of gendered play in preschools: how early childhood educators’ perceptions of gender influence children’s play

This research aimed to explore children’s play in relation to gender stereotypes and beliefs and practices of educators in preschool settings. A feminist poststructuralist approach framed the design of the research and data were collected in two settings through predetermined categories of play during periods of spontaneous free play. The question asked in this research was, do early childhood educators’ perceptions of gender influence children’s play? Findings suggest that there were differences between these two settings and these differences are ...

Continue Reading →
0

The Racial Generation Gap and the Future for Our Children

Children are not faring well in America. Over the course of the two-year presidential campaign cycle that is well underway, eight million children will be born in this country. If our nation’s elected leaders do nothing, more than 75,000 of those children born in this country below the age of 2 will be abused or neglected, over 500,000 will be uninsured, and nearly two million will live in poverty — a disadvantage that research has shown to have lifelong negative ...

Continue Reading →
0

Building a STEM Pathway: Xavier University of Louisiana’s Summer Science Academy

In Louisia, Xavier University provides a STEM summer Academy as a bridge program for persons of color between middle and high school. Underrepresented groups, such as Hispanics and Blacks, earn less than 15% of STEM bachelor’s degree, despite a large interest in these programs and degrees. The discrepancies in income levels may constitute this difference, causing an achievement gap. This program, as well as this report, offer state suggestions to narrow this gap.

 

 

Building a STEM Pathway: Xavier University of Louisiana’s ...

Continue Reading →
0

Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international adoptees: a meta-analysis.

International adoption involves more than 40,000 children a year moving among more than 100 countries. Before adoption, internationaladoptees often experience insufficient medical care, malnutrition, maternal separation, and neglect and abuse in orphanages. Most international adoptees are well-adjusted although they are referred to mental health services more often than nonadopted controls. However, international adoptees present fewer behavior problems and are less often referred to mental health services than domesticadoptees.

 

Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international ...

Continue Reading →
0

International research on the effectiveness of widening participation

HEFCE commissioned CFE and Edge Hill University to produce a report on effective approaches to widening participation in six case study countries: the Netherlands, the US, Australia, South Africa, Norway and Ireland. The review was commissioned to inform the national strategy for access and student success which HEFCE and the Office for Fair Access are jointly developing.

The aims of the research are:

  • to critically examine the evidence for the impact and effectiveness of activity and policies specifically focused on widening participation and ...
Continue Reading →
0

REPORT: Becoming Adults

Young adults with histories of foster care or juvenile justice custody experience poor outcomes across a number of domains, on average, relative to their peers. While government funding for services targeting these groups of young people has increased in recent years, research on the effectiveness of such services is limited, and few of the programs that have been rigorously tested have been found to improve outcomes.

The Youth Villages Transitional Living Evaluation is testing whether the Transitional Living program, operated by the ...

Continue Reading →
0

Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schools

Inadequate college preparation in elementary and secondary school creates a significant barrier to postsecondary education among students living in poverty, a report from CLASP finds. Based on an analysis of the  hundred largest school districts in the United States, the report, Course, Counselor, and Teacher Gaps: Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schools (17 pages, PDF), highlights the stark differences in the quality of preparation students receive in high-poverty schools compared with students in ...

Continue Reading →
0
Page 2 of 3 123