Policy

Health Effects of Media on Children and Adolescents

Youth spend an average of >7 hours/day using media, and the vast majority of them have access to a bedroom television, computer, the Internet, a video-game console, and a cell phone. In this article we review the most recent research on the effects of media on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Studies have shown that media can provide information about safe health practices and can foster social connectedness. However, recent evidence raises concerns about media’s effects on ...

Continue Reading →
0

Child-Care Structure → Process → Outcome: Direct and Indirect Effects of Child-Care Quality on Young Children’s Development

With data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care, we used structural equation modeling to test paths from structural indicators of child-care quality, specifically caregiver training and child-staff ratio, through a process indicator to child outcomes. There were three main findings: (a) Quality of maternal caregiving was the strongest predictor of cognitive competence, as well as caregivers’ ratings of social competence; (b) quality of nonmaternal caregiving was associated with cognitive competence and caregivers’ ratings of social competence; and (c) ...

Continue Reading →
0

Snapshot: Civil Citations

When youth get in trouble with the law, it’s important to take a level-headed approach that helps them become contributing members of society while ensuring community safety. Unfortunately, our current juvenile justice system is like an exceptionally difficult maze, with too many paths in and too few ways out. But just entering the maze can have devastating consequences for society at large and for the young people themselves. As stated in a report by the National Institute of Justice and ...

Continue Reading →
0

Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth

The Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth(Midwest Study) is a longitudinal study that has been following a sample of young people from Iowa, Wisconsin, and Illinois as they transition out of foster care into adulthood. It is a collaborative effort involving Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago; the University of Wisconsin Survey Center; and the public child welfare agencies in Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin.

The Midwest Study provides a comprehensive picture of how foster youth are ...

Continue Reading →
0

The Racial Generation Gap and the Future for Our Children

Children are not faring well in America. Over the course of the two-year presidential campaign cycle that is well underway, eight million children will be born in this country. If our nation’s elected leaders do nothing, more than 75,000 of those children born in this country below the age of 2 will be abused or neglected, over 500,000 will be uninsured, and nearly two million will live in poverty — a disadvantage that research has shown to have lifelong negative ...

Continue Reading →
0

New AAP Report Targets Lack of Adequate Food as Ongoing Health Risk to US Children

For the first time, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is recommending that pediatricians screen all children for food insecurity. In a new policy statement identifying the short and long-term adverse health impacts of food insecurity, the AAP also recommends that pediatricians become familiar with and refer families to needed community resources, and advocate for federal and local policies that support access to adequate, nutritious food.

The new policy statement, “Promoting Food Security for all Children​,” will be presented at ...

Continue Reading →
0

Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international adoptees: a meta-analysis.

International adoption involves more than 40,000 children a year moving among more than 100 countries. Before adoption, internationaladoptees often experience insufficient medical care, malnutrition, maternal separation, and neglect and abuse in orphanages. Most international adoptees are well-adjusted although they are referred to mental health services more often than nonadopted controls. However, international adoptees present fewer behavior problems and are less often referred to mental health services than domesticadoptees.

 

Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international ...

Continue Reading →
0

Stories from the Front Lines of Student Success: The Implementation and Progress of Near Peer Mentoring Programs in Alaska and Idaho

This brief provides an overview of the implementation and impact of near peer mentoring programs in Alaska and Idaho from the standpoint of both existing research and the near peers themselves. In addition to offering strategies and promising practices that have helped foster a college-going culture in both states, the brief provides testimonials from mentors and the students they have served – students who might otherwise never considered college as an option without the extra support of a near peer ...

Continue Reading →
0

UNDERSTANDING WHY ADOPTEES ARE AT HIGHER RISK FOR SUICIDE

Most people view adoption as a happy, even blessed, event. A child finds a new family: nothing but joy, right? Adoption can be happy, a blessing, joyful. For some adoptees, though, adoption is complex, and can be filled with as much loss as love.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, adoptees are four times more likely to attempt suicide than non-adoptees. It’shere in Pediatrics. Even more startling is that the mean age of the 1000 participants was about 14. ...

Continue Reading →
0

Second-Generation Antipsychotic Drug Use Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children: Quality-of-Care Concerns

Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are a class of drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and psychotic depression. SGAs are widely used to treat children enrolled in Medicaid who have mental health conditions. However, SGAs can have serious side effects and little clinical research has been conducted on the safety of treating children with these drugs. Consequently, children’s treatment with SGAs needs careful management and monitoring. This evaluation examines the quality of care provided to children receiving ...

Continue Reading →
0

Mental Disorders and Disabilities Among Low-Income Children

Since 1975, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has paid benefits to poor children with disabilities through the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. In 2013, approximately 1.3 million children received SSI disability benefits, roughly half of whom qualified primarily due to a mental disorder. In response to considerable and recurring interest in the growth and sustainability of the SSI program for children, SSA commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to identify trends in the prevalence of mental disorders ...

Continue Reading →
0

International research on the effectiveness of widening participation

HEFCE commissioned CFE and Edge Hill University to produce a report on effective approaches to widening participation in six case study countries: the Netherlands, the US, Australia, South Africa, Norway and Ireland. The review was commissioned to inform the national strategy for access and student success which HEFCE and the Office for Fair Access are jointly developing.

The aims of the research are:

  • to critically examine the evidence for the impact and effectiveness of activity and policies specifically focused on widening participation and ...
Continue Reading →
0
Page 2 of 3 123