Social anxiety

Pathways linking marijuana use to substance use problems among emerging adults: A prospective analysis of young Black men

Marijuana use rates peak during emerging adulthood (ages 18 to 25years). Although marijuana use quantity reliably predicts substance-related problems, considerable individual differences characterize this association. The aims of the present study were to examine the influence of community disadvantage in amplifying the effects of marijuana use on downstream substance use problems, as well as the mediating influence of social disengagement in the path linking marijuana use frequency to related problems.

 

Pathways linking marijuana use to substance use problems among emerging ...

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DOES “HOVERING” MATTER? HELICOPTER PARENTING AND ITS EFFECT ON WELL-BEING

The phenomenon popularly referred to as helicopter parenting refers to an overinvolvement of parents in their children’s lives. This concept has typically been used to describe parents of college-aged young adults. Despite much anecdotal evidence, little is known about its existence and consequences from an empirical perspective. Using a sample of college students at a university in the United States (N = 317), the exploration and measurement of this concept is examined. Results of factor analysis of helicopter parenting items constructed for ...

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Social stressors, coping behaviors, and depressive symptoms: A latent profile analysis of adolescents in military families

We investigated the relationship between context-specific social stressors, coping behaviors, and depressive symptoms among adolescents in active duty military families across seven installations (three of which were in Europe) (N = 1036) using a person-centered approach and a stress process theoretical framework. Results of the exploratory latent profile analysis revealed four distinct coping profiles: Disengaged Copers, Troubled Copers, Humor-intensive Copers, and Active Copers. Multinomial logistic regressions found no relationship between military-related stressors (parental separation, frequent relocations, and parental rank) and ...

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Bullying of Disabled and Non-Disabled High School Students

Students with disabilities are considered to be at greater risk for bullying than students without disabilities. The WestEd Justice & Prevention Research Center collaborated with staff across WestEd to analyze data from Maine’s statewide Integrated Youth Survey to examine risk rates for these student populations.

As expected, students with disabilities had substantially higher rates of bullying victimization compared to students without disabilities. WestEd researchers Sarah Guckenburg, Susan Hayes, Anthony Petrosino, and Thomas Hanson, and consultant Alexis Stern ...

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Risk of Suicide Attempt in Adopted and Nonadopted Offspring

We asked whether adoption status represented a risk of suicide attempt for adopted and nonadopted offspring living in the United States. We also examined whether factors known to be associated with suicidal behavior would mediate the relationship between adoption status and suicide attempt.

 

Risk of Suicide Attempt in Adopted and Nonadopted Offspring

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The Double-Edged Sword: Media Treatment of High-Profile Crimes and the Nation’s Mental Health Treatment Challenges

This use of violent incidents to bring up the lack of mental health services is a difficult conundrum for advocates because the fear it creates in the public about people with disabilities is largely unjustified and further unjustly isolating of people who may already be marginalized. It’s also not clear that these incidents lead to new programming or resources.

 

The Double-Edged Sword: Media Treatment of High-Profile Crimes and the Nation’s Mental Health Treatment Challenges

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Social anxiety and technology: Face-to-face communication versus technological communication among teens

This study examined teens’ use of socially interactive technologies (SITs), such as online social sites, cell phones/text messaging, and instant messaging (IM), and the role that social anxiety plays on how teens communicate with others (technologically or face-to-face). Participants included 280 high school students from a large western city. On average, 35–40% of teens reported using cell phones/text messaging and online social sites between 1 and 4 h daily, 24% reported using IMs 1–4 h daily and only 8% reported using email ...

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