Roles/Recognition

Paths to Positive Development: a Model of Outcomes in the New Zealand Youth Transitions Study

This study examined predictors of positive developmental outcomes, including: life satisfaction; optimism; educational achievement; civic engagement; and positive peer influence; in a sample of young people comprised of a study group (n = 593) facing significant challenges and a comparison group (n = 778) who were progressing more normatively. The study modelled the demographic, risk, and resource predictors of positive outcomes across both groups, and compared the fit of the model across groups using integrative data analysis techniques. Results suggested ...

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Adolescent Behavioral, Emotional, and Cognitive Engagement Trajectories in School and Their Differential Relations to Educational Success

The current study used a multidimensional approach to examine developmental trajectories of three dimension of school engagement (school participation, sense of school belonging, and self-regulated learning) from grades 7 to 11 and their relationships to changes in adolescents’ academic outcomes over time. The sample includes 1,148 African American and European American adolescents (52% females, 56% black, 34% white, and 10% others). As expected, the downward trajectories of change in school participation, sense of belonging to school, and self-regulated learning differed ...

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Patterns of adolescent bullying behaviors: Physical, verbal, exclusion, rumor, and cyber

Patterns of engagement in cyber bullying and four types of traditional bullying were examined using latent class analysis (LCA). Demographic differences and externalizing problems were evaluated across latent class membership. Data were obtained from the 2005–2006 Health Behavior in School-aged Survey and the analytic sample included 7,508 U.S. adolescents in grades 6 through 10. LCA models were tested on physical bullying, verbal bullying, social exclusion, spreading rumors, and cyber bullying behaviors. Three latent classes were identified for each gender: All-Types ...

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Genetic Moderation of Transactional Relations Between Parenting Practices and Child Self-Regulation

The present study addressed the ways in which parent and child dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) genotypes jointly moderate the transactional relations between parenting practices and child self-regulation. African American children ( = 309) and their parents provided longitudinal data spanning child ages 11 to 15 years and a saliva sample from which variation at DRD4 was genotyped. Based on the differential susceptibility perspective, this study examined moderation effects of DRD4 status on (a) the extent to which parenting practices affect ...

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Peer socialization of gender in young boys and girls

By the time children are about 3 years old, they have already begun to form their gender identity.1 In other words, they are aware of the fact that they are boys or girls and that there are certain behaviours, activities, toys and interests that are played with more often by boys and girls. Gender differences in children’s behaviours and interactional patterns also begin to become apparent by this age. For instance, boys are more active, physical and play in larger ...

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A case study of gendered play in preschools: how early childhood educators’ perceptions of gender influence children’s play

This research aimed to explore children’s play in relation to gender stereotypes and beliefs and practices of educators in preschool settings. A feminist poststructuralist approach framed the design of the research and data were collected in two settings through predetermined categories of play during periods of spontaneous free play. The question asked in this research was, do early childhood educators’ perceptions of gender influence children’s play? Findings suggest that there were differences between these two settings and these differences are ...

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Social anxiety and technology: Face-to-face communication versus technological communication among teens

This study examined teens’ use of socially interactive technologies (SITs), such as online social sites, cell phones/text messaging, and instant messaging (IM), and the role that social anxiety plays on how teens communicate with others (technologically or face-to-face). Participants included 280 high school students from a large western city. On average, 35–40% of teens reported using cell phones/text messaging and online social sites between 1 and 4 h daily, 24% reported using IMs 1–4 h daily and only 8% reported using email ...

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What a Teenage Boy Needs Most from his Mom – Monica Swanson

Between conversations with other moms, plenty of books on the subject, and talking to my boys directly, I have come up with what I think are the eleven most important things…

via What a Teenage Boy Needs Most from his Mom – Monica Swanson.

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What Elementary Age Boys Need Most from Their Parents. – Monica Swanson

In my recent post “What a Teenage boy needs most from his Mom,” I confessed that the teen years are my favorite.   I love my teen boys, and the glimpses of manhood mixed with occasional remnants of boyhood that I see in them.  The teens years are what I call my reward for all of the hard work that came in the younger years.

So, what about those younger years?  Many people have commented and emailed asking  “What are some things you suggest ...

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Families, Schools, and Community: Partners in Children’s Well-Being | Alliance1

The Family Distress Model (FDM) is a non-pathology-based conceptual framework for understanding reactions families may have to problems. The Family Outreach Model (FOM) provides strategies social workers can use to coach teachers about their interactions with families in distress. FDM identifies five phases of family functioning, which FOM builds on to specify indicators for each stage, effects of each stage, useful conversations, and ways educators can ...

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The Research Behind Social and Emotional Learning | Edutopia

Teaching without implementing social and emotional learning (SEL) is like leading kids without shoes on a trek across the Appalachians. Count on a short trip with lots of whining.

The goals of SEL, according to the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), “are to one, promote students’ self-awareness, self-management, social-awareness, relationships, ...

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3 Ways to Build Trust in Professional Learning – Learning Forward’s PD Watch – Education Week Teacher

National education reports often have difficulty getting attention, but that was not the case when the Gallup polling organization released State of America’s Schools.  Rather than prescribing technocratic approaches for improving education, the report focused on the “human elements” that drive student achievement.

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