Dependencies

Black Hawk down? Establishing helicopter parenting as a distinct construct from other forms of parental control during emerging adulthood.

The purpose of the current study was to establish a measure of helicopter parenting that was distinct from other forms of parental control, and to examine parental and behavioral correlates of helicopter parenting. Participants included 438 undergraduate students from four universities in the United States (M(age) = 19.65, SD = 2.00, range = 18-29; 320 women, 118 men), and at least one of their parents. Analyses revealed that helicopter parenting loaded on a separate factor from both behavioral and psychological ...

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Social anxiety and technology: Face-to-face communication versus technological communication among teens

This study examined teens’ use of socially interactive technologies (SITs), such as online social sites, cell phones/text messaging, and instant messaging (IM), and the role that social anxiety plays on how teens communicate with others (technologically or face-to-face). Participants included 280 high school students from a large western city. On average, 35–40% of teens reported using cell phones/text messaging and online social sites between 1 and 4 h daily, 24% reported using IMs 1–4 h daily and only 8% reported using email ...

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What a Teenage Boy Needs Most from his Mom – Monica Swanson

Between conversations with other moms, plenty of books on the subject, and talking to my boys directly, I have come up with what I think are the eleven most important things…

via What a Teenage Boy Needs Most from his Mom – Monica Swanson.

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What Elementary Age Boys Need Most from Their Parents. – Monica Swanson

In my recent post “What a Teenage boy needs most from his Mom,” I confessed that the teen years are my favorite.   I love my teen boys, and the glimpses of manhood mixed with occasional remnants of boyhood that I see in them.  The teens years are what I call my reward for all of the hard work that came in the younger years.

So, what about those younger years?  Many people have commented and emailed asking  “What are some things you suggest ...

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Families, Schools, and Community: Partners in Children’s Well-Being | Alliance1

The Family Distress Model (FDM) is a non-pathology-based conceptual framework for understanding reactions families may have to problems. The Family Outreach Model (FOM) provides strategies social workers can use to coach teachers about their interactions with families in distress. FDM identifies five phases of family functioning, which FOM builds on to specify indicators for each stage, effects of each stage, useful conversations, and ways educators can ...

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The Research Behind Social and Emotional Learning | Edutopia

Teaching without implementing social and emotional learning (SEL) is like leading kids without shoes on a trek across the Appalachians. Count on a short trip with lots of whining.

The goals of SEL, according to the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), “are to one, promote students’ self-awareness, self-management, social-awareness, relationships, ...

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The Value of Unstructured Play Time for Kids – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

There has been plenty of hand-wringing in recent years about the “overscheduled child.” With after-school hours increasingly dominated by piano lessons, soccer practice, and countless other planned activities, many of us have a nagging sense that kids are missing out on something important if they have no time for unstructured play.

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Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma

Violence and trauma can have serious and long-lasting consequences for children’s physical and mental health, and the cost to families, communities, and the Nation is staggering. Victims lend their voices to this video to provide first-hand accounts of how their exposure to violence as children affected them.

Through Our Eyes: Children, Violence, and Trauma.

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3 Ways to Make Meaningful Connections with Your Students | Edutopia

Too often, I’ve heard teachers talk about how helpless they feel when it comes to reaching out to their students. The days of being the person whose job it is to exclusively provide students with an education — and nothing more — are long ...

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