Attention and Focus

The Effects of Technology on Engagement and Retention Among Upper Elementary Montessori Students.

The purpose of this paper is to describe the findings of a study on the effects of
integrating technology into lessons in a Montessori upper elementary classroom in
Raleigh, North Carolina. The research looked at both the student engagement and the
retention of information when technology was included in Montessori lessons. This study
spanned a six-week period and was conducted with 25 fourth through sixth grade
students. Data collection included a pre-lesson questionnaire, a teacher engagement
report form, a teacher ...

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Unattended musical beats enhance visual processing

Abstract

The present study investigated whether and how a musical rhythm entrains a listener’s visual attention. To this end, participants were presented with pictures of faces and houses and indicated whether picture orientation was upright or inverted. Participants performed this task in silence or with a musical rhythm playing in the background. In the latter condition, pictures could occur off-beat or on a rhythmically implied, silent beat. Pictures presented without the musical rhythm and off-beat were responded to ...

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Study: Positive Reinforcement Plays Key Role in Cognitive Task Performance in ADHD Kids

A little recognition for a job well done means a lot to children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) – more so than it would for typically developing kids.

That praise, or other possible reward, improves the performance of children with ADHD on certain cognitive tasks, but until a recent study led by researchers from the University at Buffalo, it wasn’t clear if that result was due to heightened motivation inspired by positive reinforcement or because those with ADHD simply had greater ...

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International research on the effectiveness of widening participation

HEFCE commissioned CFE and Edge Hill University to produce a report on effective approaches to widening participation in six case study countries: the Netherlands, the US, Australia, South Africa, Norway and Ireland. The review was commissioned to inform the national strategy for access and student success which HEFCE and the Office for Fair Access are jointly developing.

The aims of the research are:

  • to critically examine the evidence for the impact and effectiveness of activity and policies specifically focused on widening participation and ...
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This is your child’s brain on reading

When parents read to their children the difference shows in children’s behavior and academic performance. And according to a new study, the difference also shows in their brain activity.

Researchers looked at children ages 3 to 5 who underwent brain scans called functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to a pre-recorded story. The parents answered questions about how much they read to, and communicated with, their children.

 

This is your child’s brain on reading

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How Stories Change the Brain

Why are we so attracted to stories? My lab has spent the last several years seeking to understand why stories can move us to tears, change our attitudes, opinions and behaviors, and even inspire us—and how stories change our brains, often for the better. Here’s what we’ve learned.

 

How Stories Change the Brain

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Five Tips for Helping Teens Manage Technology | Greater Good

 

The combination of technological change and normal adolescent development creates a huge challenge for today’s parents—there was no Instagram when the people raising today’s teens were in high school. Though there is no one-size-fits-all approach to guiding teens’ technology use, understanding these tectonic changes can help parents better guide their young teens in the wise use of technology. Here are five research-based tips.

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Time Spent in Sleep | Child Trends

The role of sleep in children’s development is incompletely understood. However, perceived inadequate or poor-quality sleep is associated with a number of emotional, behavioral, and health problems.[1]

Remarkably, although the physiological requirement for sleep is undisputed, there is little consensus on how much sleep children ...

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Ten Ways We Can Respond to Inappropriate Behaviors | American Camp Association

This summer at camp you are bound to encounter some behaviors that are inappropriate. The types of possible behaviors are too numerous to list. As frontline staff, having a range of strategies to respond to these varying behaviors immediately will be critical to your success. The ten response types that make up the response-style curve provide a generalized set of options that can be used in any situation.

 

Ten Ways We Can Respond to ...

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