College

Helping or Hovering? The Effects of Helicopter Parenting on College Students’ Well-Being

Parental involvement is related to many positive child outcomes, but if not developmentally appropriate, it can be associated with higher levels of child anxiety and depression. Few studies have examined the effects of over-controlling parenting, or “helicopter parenting,” in college students. Some studies have found that college students of over-controlling parents report feeling less satisfied with family life and have lower levels of psychological well-being. This study examined self-determination theory as the potential underlying mechanism explaining this relationship. College students ...

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Black Hawk down? Establishing helicopter parenting as a distinct construct from other forms of parental control during emerging adulthood.

The purpose of the current study was to establish a measure of helicopter parenting that was distinct from other forms of parental control, and to examine parental and behavioral correlates of helicopter parenting. Participants included 438 undergraduate students from four universities in the United States (M(age) = 19.65, SD = 2.00, range = 18-29; 320 women, 118 men), and at least one of their parents. Analyses revealed that helicopter parenting loaded on a separate factor from both behavioral and psychological ...

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DOES “HOVERING” MATTER? HELICOPTER PARENTING AND ITS EFFECT ON WELL-BEING

The phenomenon popularly referred to as helicopter parenting refers to an overinvolvement of parents in their children’s lives. This concept has typically been used to describe parents of college-aged young adults. Despite much anecdotal evidence, little is known about its existence and consequences from an empirical perspective. Using a sample of college students at a university in the United States (N = 317), the exploration and measurement of this concept is examined. Results of factor analysis of helicopter parenting items constructed for ...

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Publications and Reports: ACHA-NCHA II: Spring 2016

The ACHA-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II) is a national research survey organized by the American College Health Association (ACHA) to assist college health service providers, health educators, counselors, and administrators in collecting data about their students’ habits, behaviors, and perceptions on the most prevalent health topics. ACHA initiated the original ACHA-NCHA in 2000 and the instrument was used nation wide through the spring 2008 data collection period. The ACHA-NCHA now provides the largest known comprehensive data set on ...

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College students’ mental health is a growing concern, survey finds

Ninety-five percent of college counseling center directors surveyed said the number of students with significant psychological problems is a growing concern in their center or on campus, according to the latest Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors survey of counseling center directors. Seventy percent of directors believe that the number of students with severe psychological problems on their campus has increased in the past year.

The survey also found that:

  • Anxiety is the top presenting concern among college students (41.6 ...
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Linking Family-of-Origin Experiences and Perpetration of Sexual Coercion: College Males’ Sense of Entitlement

Sexual coercion on college campuses has become of major concern in recent decades. In recent years, researchers and policy makers have called for greater attention to this topic in order to reduce the sexual violence on college campuses. Recent research has examined the impact of family-of-origin experiences on the perpetration of sexual coercion. The current study examines the association between family-of-origin experiences, such as warmth and hostility between parents, inconsistent parenting, and overparenting during childhood, and the perpetration of sexual ...

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Helicopter Parenting and Emerging Adult Self-Efficacy: Implications for Mental and Physical Health

Abstract
Helicopter parenting has become an increasing concern among practitioners, college administrators, and professors. Further, some research has indicated that this form of parenting may have a deleterious effect on emerging adult college students’ mental health. This study examines the factor structure of the Helicopter Parenting Behaviors measure, a recent scale developed to examine intrusive and supportive parenting behaviors, by using confirmatory factor ...
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Building a STEM Pathway: Xavier University of Louisiana’s Summer Science Academy

In Louisia, Xavier University provides a STEM summer Academy as a bridge program for persons of color between middle and high school. Underrepresented groups, such as Hispanics and Blacks, earn less than 15% of STEM bachelor’s degree, despite a large interest in these programs and degrees. The discrepancies in income levels may constitute this difference, causing an achievement gap. This program, as well as this report, offer state suggestions to narrow this gap.

 

 

Building a STEM Pathway: Xavier University of Louisiana’s ...

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Stories from the Front Lines of Student Success: The Implementation and Progress of Near Peer Mentoring Programs in Alaska and Idaho

This brief provides an overview of the implementation and impact of near peer mentoring programs in Alaska and Idaho from the standpoint of both existing research and the near peers themselves. In addition to offering strategies and promising practices that have helped foster a college-going culture in both states, the brief provides testimonials from mentors and the students they have served – students who might otherwise never considered college as an option without the extra support of a near peer ...

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Study: How students of different backgrounds use strategies to strengthen college applications

Years of research show that students from families of higher socioeconomic status are more likely to attend college—particularly more selective institutions—thanks to a variety of factors, including academic preparation, attendance at higher performing schools, and other social, cultural, and financial resources available to families with more means.

In addition to their traditional coursework, students often try to make their college applications more competitive through what the researchers call “college enhancement strategies,” including Advanced Placement (AP) exams, SAT preparation courses or materials, ...

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Report: The Mentoring Effect

Based off a survey regarding young persons and mentoring, there is not only a mentoring gap in America but also a mentoring need. It is estimated that more than one in three youths, which is roughly 16 million, have never had an adult mentor. This estimate includes roughly nine million at-risk youths, who are therefore less likely to graduate high school, go to college, and lead healthy and productive lives. Those that have been found to have a mentor provides ...

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Debt, Jobs, or Housing: What’s Keeping Millennials at Home?

Young Americans’ residence choices have changed markedly over the past fifteen years, with recent cohorts entering the housing market at lower rates, and lingering much longer in parents’ households. This paper begins with descriptive evidence on the residence choices of 1 percent of young Americans with credit reports, observed quarterly for fifteen years in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Equifax-sourced Consumer Credit Panel (CCP). Steep increases in the rate of living with parents or other substantially older household ...

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