Adoption

Adoptive Gay Father Families: Parent–Child Relationships and Children’s Psychological Adjustment

Findings are presented on a U.K. study of 41 gay father families, 40 lesbian mother families, and 49 heterosexual parent families with an adopted child aged 3–9 years. Standardized interview and observational and questionnaire measures of parental well-being, quality of parent–child relationships, child adjustment, and child sex-typed behavior were administered to parents, children, and teachers. The findings indicated more positive parental well-being and parenting in gay father families compared to heterosexual parent families. Child externalizing problems were greater among children in ...

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Do internationally adopted children in the Netherlands use more medication than their non-adopted peers?

Empirical evidence has shown that international adoptees present physical growth delays, precocious puberty, behavioral problems, and mental health referrals more often than non-adoptees. We hypothesized that the higher prevalence of (mental) health problems in adoptees is accompanied by elevated consumption of prescription drugs, including antidepressants, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication, and medication for growth inhibition/stimulation. In an archival, population-based Dutch cohort study, data on medication use were available from the Health Care Insurance Board ...

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Suicide, psychiatric illness, and social maladjustment in intercountry adoptees in Sweden: a cohort study.

BACKGROUND:

Many intercountry adoptees are reaching adolescence in western Europe and the USA, and the mental health and social adjustment of these individuals as adolescents and young adults has now become an important issue. We aimed to assess mental health disorders and social maladjustment in adolescence and young adulthood in intercountry adoptees in Sweden.

METHOD:

Our data was obtained from the Swedish national registers for the cohort born in 1970-79. We used multivariate Cox’s regression models of person-years to compare indicators of suicide ...

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VCU Study: Bad environment Augments Genetic Risk for Drug Abuse

The risk of abusing drugs is greater – even for adopted children – if the family environment in which they are raised is dysfunctional, according to a new study conducted by a collaborative team from Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden.

Previous research suggests that drug abuse is strongly influenced by a mix of genetic factors and the environment, including influences of family and peers. That research is primarily based on twin studies and typically involves families that are ...

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Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international adoptees: a meta-analysis.

International adoption involves more than 40,000 children a year moving among more than 100 countries. Before adoption, internationaladoptees often experience insufficient medical care, malnutrition, maternal separation, and neglect and abuse in orphanages. Most international adoptees are well-adjusted although they are referred to mental health services more often than nonadopted controls. However, international adoptees present fewer behavior problems and are less often referred to mental health services than domesticadoptees.

 

Behavior problems and mental health referrals of international ...

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UNDERSTANDING WHY ADOPTEES ARE AT HIGHER RISK FOR SUICIDE

Most people view adoption as a happy, even blessed, event. A child finds a new family: nothing but joy, right? Adoption can be happy, a blessing, joyful. For some adoptees, though, adoption is complex, and can be filled with as much loss as love.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, adoptees are four times more likely to attempt suicide than non-adoptees. It’shere in Pediatrics. Even more startling is that the mean age of the 1000 participants was about 14. ...

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Risk of Suicide Attempt in Adopted and Nonadopted Offspring

We asked whether adoption status represented a risk of suicide attempt for adopted and nonadopted offspring living in the United States. We also examined whether factors known to be associated with suicidal behavior would mediate the relationship between adoption status and suicide attempt.

 

Risk of Suicide Attempt in Adopted and Nonadopted Offspring

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Adoption as a Risk Factor for Attempted Suicide During Adolescence

Depression, impulsivity, and aggression during adolescence have been associated with both adoption and suicidal behavior. Studies of adopted adults suggest that impulsivity, even more than depression, may be an inherited factor that mediates suicidal behavior. However, the association between adoption and adolescent suicide attempts and the mechanisms that might explain it remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the following: 1) whether suicide attempts are more common among adolescents who live with adoptive parents rather than biological ...

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